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Chapter 1 From Hell to Heaven

Chapter 1

Robert Blum’s life on Earth

[RB 1.1.1] Robert Blum arrived on Earth under the most extreme penury, and had to contend with grinding poverty almost to his last years, which nonetheless was his lot for good reason, incomprehensible to the world, of course. His soul and spirit came from that planet whose inhabitants, as revealed in The Natural Sun, are wont to stubbornly shift entire mountains with avid determination; and whatever they don’t accomplish physically, they continue doing as spirits.

[RB 1.1.2] This man, who was executed on account of his daring, had already in childhood demonstrated the tenacity of his spirit. Although I Myself had to, in his best interest, place suitable obstacles in his path whenever he tended to exalt himself, this was of little effect for this world, as the persistency of his spirit elbowed him a way out, from his inconsequence to a broader mandate.

[RB 1.1.3] He was wont to spawn a thousand plans and put them into action forthwith. He was above all permeated with social justice, which he did not shy away from implementing. Had he possessed all the world’s treasures for realising his overriding idea he would have wagered the lot, together with his life!

[RB 1.1.4] These ideas on social justice he received mainly from the worldly religious school of Ronge (Ronge, (1813 – 1887), Founder of ‘German Catholicism’, independent from Rome) and his colleagues. But this in reality is neither a school nor a church, because it denies Me as the Lord, making Me into an ordinary man and teacher of antiquity. This ‘Church’ therefore casts off the very foundation-stone upon which it strives to build its edifice, and its house shall therefore have feeble foundations.

[RB 1.1.5] Just like Ronge, so also our man built his socialistic ideas upon sand. To him, everything that the world could offer seemed small and feeble. It appeared to be left entirely up to his oratorical skill to shortly bring down the powers that be.

[RB 1.1.6] This conviction was so strong in him as to leave him no qualms. Even where I warned him inwardly against undertakings too brazen, this did not hold him back from whatever he set his mind to, it being one of his maxims that a true German will not shirk any sacrifice towards an idea seized upon by his mind.

[RB 1.1.7] Several distinct successes maintained his zeal, and when he had moved some political molehills he would then tackle the Himalayas. He thereby gained notoriety, and the trust of an entire nation, which however blazed the trail for his earthly downfall.

[RB 1.1.8] He tested his debating skill at the 1848 German National Assembly several times, which brought him much satisfaction, which was of course mainly due to his powerful spirit. Encouraged thereby, he hastened to a big East German city (Vienna) where the crowds actually began to prominently implement his ideas. Whereupon he tried to, as it were, kill thirty princely flies with one blow, not considering that I too had a few words to say through these flies.

[RB 1.1.9] Our man started off mainly from an idea he borrowed from My word: ‘Be ye therefore perfect, as your Father in heaven is perfect’; and that only one is Lord, all others being brethren, regardless of status. But he did not in the first instance believe in the One, whom men should emulate in perfection. For the Lord, he actually took himself to be – through his debating skill. He forgot that the princes also are humans, in possession of power out of Me; forgetting also the passage ‘Give to Caesar what is due to Caesar, and to God what is due to God!’

[RB 1.1.10] This man was arrested in the above city, where he wanted to realise his ideas of social justice through the power of arms, as well as speech, being charged with sedition and, after a short trial, dispatched into the beyond. Therewith his this-worldly action was terminated.

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